"Transatlantic Feral Folk..."

“Never mind a folk revival, these days ‘folk’ has become a high street commodity.”
- The Guardian

“It’s the only music where it isn’t simple. It’s weird, full of legend, myth, bible and ghosts, chaos, watermelons, clocks...everything.”
- Bob Dylan...describing ‘folk music’


Although partly inspired by the generic cross-over exemplified by BBC 4’s Transatlantic Sessions, Stone Junction has never quite settled on a comprehensive label for their own particular musical genre and style. Folk, bluegrass, Americana, Celtic, roots and original acoustic music are all just approximations of Stone Junction’s personal reinterpretation and interlacing of the plethora of elements of an evolving folk tradition into fresh, stunning and contemporary patterns. With a wry influential nod to the 60s folk revival, blissfuly ironic string bands and a sprinkling of Laurel Canyon, Stone Junction deliver stunning and unusual three-part harmonies combined with skilled instrumentals featuring guitars, mandolin, banjo, accordion, flute, whistles and double bass...creating an incomparable sound that is all their own...while proving everything doesn’t have to fit in a box...

Stone Junction can be heard at a variety of pubs, music venues, festivals and folk clubs. As well as appearing regularly in venues around the south-east, the band has also co-headlined or played support for other touring musicians such as Pilgrims Way, Niamh Ni Charra, James Yorkston Meet on the Ledge and Sarah McQuaid. Along side of their extensive traditional, contemporary and original song repertoire, Stone Junction can even deliver a proper foot-stomping traditional Irish set for that Guinness and Jamesons fueled St Patrick’s Day craic. For the more Celtic-centric events, Stone Junction has occasionally added a guest fiddle player such as Garry Blakeley and Chan Reid.

If you’re curious about the band’s name, it’s taken from a novel called Stone Junction written by Jim Dodge. It’s a great book and we highly recommend reading it.


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